Holiday Journal- Crete, Greece. A secret hidden in plain sight (Part IV)

Kales Fort, Ierapetra, Crete
Kales Fort, Ierapetra, Crete
Chrisi Island, Crete
Chrisi Island, Crete
 Nakou Village, Koutsounari, Crete
Nakou Village, Koutsounari, Crete
Taverna Psaropoula, Koutsounari, Crete
Taverna Psaropoula, Koutsounari, Crete
Chrisi Island
Chrisi Island
On the yacht on the way to Chrisi Island from Iarapetra
On the yacht on the way to Chrisi Island from Iarapetra

Last week we were invited by Travel Massive- Crete Chapter to take part in their #Crete4Seasons Road Trip- a huge event aimed at promoting the beautiful island of Crete to travelers in low season. This Photo Journal is the result. Enjoy!

The Road Trip part IV

The last part of our journey would be like a vacation inside a holiday. We were promised golden sands beaches, crystal turquoise waters and many culinary delights of the sea food variety. Until at that point we did not really have the chance to sample the sea food because Crete has so many vegetarian and meat dishes to discover. People laugh at you when you tell them but having so many delicious dishes brought in front of you is really hard work.

But the last two days were all about spear caught fish and grilled octopus and shrimp saganaki, boat rides, beautiful vistas and great friends. What more can one ask from life?

And I would love to tell you more about Iarapetra, Europe most southern town, and about Spinalonga Island, where we had the best tour guide in Crete ( Mrs. Evi Petsaggouraki ) or about the magical country roads that link all these beautiful places, but instead I want to talk about what impressed me most about Crete: its people. They are the very definition of hospitality and friendliness.

From mayors to old people playing backgammon in the village tavern, all Cretans, without exception were formidable hosts: they know how to make you feel welcome, are always curious to learn from you, even if they speak little or no English and will always give you something to eat and drink with or without money. This arises from their turbulent past, when a lot of the locals were left without food and shelter because of wars, earthquakes, occupations, etc. And they only had each other for help.

This is truly a humbling experience for the ragged traveler used to the modern traveling industry. In a way, going back to Crete will feel like going home.

So here’s to you my Cretan friends and thanks so much for being what you are.